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FDA has no objections to GRAS status of Cargill’s canola lecithin

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The FDA has issued a GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) letter of no objection for Cargill’s canola lecithin for use in a variety of foods.

While some varieties of canola are genetically engineered, Cargill uses non-GMO varieties for its lecithin, which is soy-free, and does not require allergen-warning labels, said Cargill Texturizing Solutions regional director Americas, David Henstrom.

“By adding canola lecithin to our well-established soy and sunflower lecithin GMO and Non-GMO portfolio, our customers can be assured that whatever their needs, we have plant-sourced lecithin options that will work for them.”

An emulsifier with comparable functionality, taste, color and dispersibility to soy and sunflower lecithin, Cargill’s canola lecithin may be used in a wide variety of food applications, including chocolate and confectionery, beverages, bakery and convenience foods, said Cargill.

“As a result, Cargill’s canola lecithin may be used as a one-to-one replacement for other lecithin types, making it easy for food manufacturers to incorporate into their product formulations with only minor adaptations.”

Read the FDA's letter to Cargill HERE.

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